Tag Archives: Canada

Season Greetings

At Plenty Full Services we have enjoyed making a match for your personalized customer satisfaction program to keep your customers engaged with your business.

Wishing you a…

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And may 2016 bring you all the customers you need.

2016 Merry Christmas & Happy New Year

We are here to help keep on bringing them back… throughout the Year.

Here’s to Your Success,

Peter

Keeping Today’s Customers …

Tomorrow, Next Month and Next Year

Blanket print advertising has been a traditional mainstay of marketing but in today’s electronic world it is losing ground. Customers are mobile; they want instant results. Few are willing to find an offer in a paper, cut it out and bring it in. There are several permanent problems with coupons in the paper. First of all, the customer has to receive the paper. Next, this form of marketing encourages consumers to wait for the best price; they may or may not consider quality or service. Plus, the business has to plan well in advance to meet deadlines and have the right offer for the right season. Then a manual, time-consuming tracking system has to be in place to crunch the numbers quickly to see the effectiveness of the marketing campaign. Once the campaign is in place, it is permanent. It can’t be easily tweaked to suit subtle market changes. It can be very costly for the results it generates.

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Blanket radio advertising is much more current. Continue reading

Hitting the Bullseye: Target Marketing

Putting an advertisement in the paper or the radio is a common practice. According to Trustmode Marketing of Vancouver, this form of advertising is ‘taking fire at whatever there is’. Another name for it is ‘Shotgun Marketing’. Because the market is so generalized it lacks focus and power.

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 Why is it important to have focus and power? Continue reading

The Bottom-Line

What does it mean when you say “the bottom-line”? What kind of thoughts are running though your mind right now? We have all heard this phrase in some form or other over the years and I think you will agree it is attached to the meaning of how well your business is doing. It also can be great service or products or an atmosphere that makes your customers feel good. Maybe you can add to this list?

What if it is something more? What if your “bottom-line” is about showing your customers you appreciate their business by doing small things for them? And they, in turn, improve your “bottom-line” by returning more often; freely giving referrals to their family and friends to do the same thing. May I ask what do you do in your business which helps your customers return?

It could be something simple like having fresh cut flowers on the table or near your cash register.

What about being connected to some of the social outlets that are popular with the younger generation?

Perhaps a brochure or pamphlet highlighting your community would be handy for visitors to your town or city.

It could be a roving musician playing at tables while people are eating… Continue reading

Gold in Your Database

In my last blog, I reminisced about the Yukon. It is a beautiful, rugged vast land that can steal your heart in a moment. Clear, cold lakes nestle in valleys where tall whispering timber cling to regal mountains; many are snowcapped. The wind blows with an icy breath even on some summer days. Many of the rivers are glacial fed and are so cold you don’t need ice to keep your beverage of choice cold. Wildlife abounds…majestic bald eagles drift effortlessly, raucous ravens outwit the best secured garbage lids, saucy squirrels dance among the trees, fish tease and fight your hook like broncs at the Stampede, the bugle call of an elk sends shivers up your spine, the moose with their massive antlers disappear as if ghosts, and sure-footed sheep skip across the mountain peaks without a care. The Yukon is a goldmine of scents and scenes to flood your senses with awe and wonder.

In today’s business world, the word ‘Goldmine’ conjures up a different image. Rather than finding gold in an ice cold mountain stream, today’s goldmine refers to innovative ideas that generate a stream of ice cold cash. One of today’s best goldmines is underused. Continue reading

Your Gold Mine

In the Klondike Gold Rush, few struck it rich. Most of the claims were registered before word spread to the rest of Canada or the lower 48. But “Gold Fever” went viral. Thousands of men and a few women made the arduous trek to the far north. The main points of entry to the rich gold fields was through Skagway and Dyea. Entrepreneurs waited for the ‘Chechakos’ who arrived each day, unprepared and ill-equipped for surviving a Yukon winter much less mine for gold. Enthusiastic business men were more than happy to help each newcomer get their kit in order. They would outfit them with the latest supplies at the going rate. (Latest meaning the kit of a previous newcomer who had traded in his supplies the day before.)

In order to pass through the Canadian border, each newcomer had to have a year’s supply of food plus their gold mining equipment, together weighing close to a ton. Every pound of it had to be hauled on their backs up the treacherous Chilkoot Pass or White Pass. The rich ones owned or rented a pack animal, mostly horses, to help them; but, many of these horses fell to their deaths, naming part of the White Pass, Dead Horse Gulch. About 30 round trips had to be made to the top where their supplies were cached. Once at the top, they had to stop either at Lindeman or Bennet lake to build a boat or raft. Continue reading